Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Commun. 2019 Mar 27;10(1):1390. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-09362-z.

Bacterial AB5 toxins inhibit the growth of gut bacteria by targeting ganglioside-like glycoconjugates.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada.
3
Division of Gastroenterology, BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6H 3V4, Canada.
4
Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E1, Canada.
5
Delta Genomics, Edmonton, AB, T5J 4P6, Canada.
6
Department of Microbiology and Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 30602, USA. cszymans@uga.edu.
7
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2E9, Canada. cszymans@uga.edu.

Abstract

The AB5 toxins cholera toxin (CT) from Vibrio cholerae and heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are notorious for their roles in diarrheal disease, but their effect on other intestinal bacteria remains unexplored. Another foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, can mimic the GM1 ganglioside receptor of CT and LT. Here we demonstrate that the toxin B-subunits (CTB and LTB) inhibit C. jejuni growth by binding to GM1-mimicking lipooligosaccharides and increasing permeability of the cell membrane. Furthermore, incubation of CTB or LTB with a C. jejuni isolate capable of altering its lipooligosaccharide structure selects for variants lacking the GM1 mimic. Examining the chicken GI tract with immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrates that GM1 reactive structures are abundant on epithelial cells and commensal bacteria, further emphasizing the relevance of this mimicry. Exposure of chickens to CTB or LTB causes shifts in the gut microbial composition, providing evidence for new toxin functions in bacterial gut competition.

PMID:
30918252
PMCID:
PMC6437147
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-09362-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center