Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Public Health. 2019 Mar 28;19(1):316. doi: 10.1186/s12889-019-6576-9.

A comparison of gender-linked population cancer risks between alcohol and tobacco: how many cigarettes are there in a bottle of wine?

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Tremona Road, Southampton, SO16 6YD, UK.
2
Public Health England, Wellington House, 133-155 Waterloo Road, London, SE1 8UG, UK.
3
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust Tremona Road, Southampton, SO16 6YD, UK.
4
NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust Tremona Road, Southampton, SO16 6YD, UK.
5
College of Health and Behavioural Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor, LL57 2UW, UK.
6
World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Investment in Health and Well-being, Public Health Wales, Cardiff, CF10 4BZ, UK.
7
Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Mailpoint 81, Level E, South Academic Block, University Hospital Southampton NHS FoundationTrust, Tremona Road, Southampton, SO16 6YD, UK. nick.sheron@soton.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In contrast to our knowledge about the number of cancers attributed to smoking, the number of cancers attributed to alcohol is poorly understood by the public. We estimate the increase in absolute risk of cancer (number of cases per 1000) attributed to moderate levels of alcohol, and compare these to the absolute risk of cancer attributed to low levels of smoking, creating a 'cigarette-equivalent of population cancer harm'.

METHODS:

Alcohol and tobacco attributable fractions were subtracted from lifetime general population risks of developing alcohol- and smoking-related cancers, to estimate the lifetime cancer risk in alcohol-abstaining non-smokers. This was multiplied by the relative risk of drinking ten units of alcohol or smoking ten cigarettes per week, and increasing levels of consumption.

RESULTS:

One bottle of wine per week is associated with an increased absolute lifetime cancer risk for non-smokers of 1.0% (men) and 1.4% (women). The overall absolute increase in cancer risk for one bottle of wine per week equals that of five (men) or ten cigarettes per week (women). Gender differences result from levels of moderate drinking leading to a 0.8% absolute risk of breast cancer in female non-smokers.

CONCLUSIONS:

One bottle of wine per week is associated with an increased absolute lifetime risk of alcohol-related cancers in women, driven by breast cancer, equivalent to the increased absolute cancer risk associated with ten cigarettes per week. These findings can help communicate that moderate levels of drinking are an important public health risk for women. The risks for men, equivalent to five cigarettes per week, are also of note.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Breast cancer; Cancer; Smoking; Tobacco

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center