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Breastfeed Med. 2019 Apr;14(3):193-202. doi: 10.1089/bfm.2018.0199. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

A Pilot Study of Human Milk to Reduce Intestinal Inflammation After Bone Marrow Transplant.

Author information

1
1 Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
2
2 Department of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3
3 Divison of Pathology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
4
4 Department of Nutrition Therapy, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
5
5 Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
6
6 Prolacta Bioscience, Duarte, California.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Human milk administration in the early peritransplant period would lower intestinal inflammation after bone marrow transplant (BMT).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Children 0-5 years undergoing BMT received either a ready-to-feed human milk preparation designed for these children (Prolacta Bioscience, Duarte, CA) or standard formula. Babies breastfeeding at the time of BMT were also enrolled on the human milk arm. Human milk was administered from day -3 until day +14 after BMT. Metagenomic shotgun sequencing and metabolomics of stool, plasma cytokines, and regenerating islet-derived 3α (REG3α) levels were measured at enrollment and day +14. Human leukocyte antigen-DR isotype (HLA-DR), CD38, and CD69 expression on T cells were evaluated at day +21.

RESULTS:

Forty-six children were enrolled, 32 received human milk (donor milk n = 23, breastfeeding babies n = 9), and 14 were controls who received standard feeds supervised by a BMT dietician. Twenty-four patients received at least 60% of goal human milk and were evaluable. Plasma interleukin (IL)-8 (p = 0.04), IL-10 (p = 0.02), and REG3α (p = 0.03) were decreased in the human milk cohort. Peripheral blood CD69+ CD8+ T cells were higher in controls (p = 0.01). Species abundance of Adenovirus (p = 0.00034), Escherichia coli (p = 0.0017), Cryptosporidium parvum (p = 0.0006), Dialister invisus (p = 0.01), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (p = 0.05) from stool was higher in controls. Stool alanine, tyrosine, methionine, and the ratio of fecal alanine to choline and phosphocholine were higher in controls (p < 0.05). No difference was observed in stool propionate and butyrate levels as measures of short-chain fatty acids between the two cohorts.

CONCLUSIONS:

Administration of human milk resulted in decreased markers of intestinal inflammation and could be a valuable adjunct for patients after BMT.

KEYWORDS:

breastfeeding and GVHD; intestinal homeostasis and human milk; microbiome and GVHD

PMID:
30916575
DOI:
10.1089/bfm.2018.0199

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