Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2019 May;40(5):528-535. doi: 10.1017/ice.2019.50. Epub 2019 Mar 27.

Outcomes from an inpatient beta-lactam allergy guideline across a large US health system.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Department of Medicine,Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine,Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
3
Harvard Medical School,Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Pharmacy,Newton-Wellesley Hospital,Newton, Massachusetts.
5
Partners HealthCare System, Quality, Safety, and Value, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Jewish General Hospital,McGill University,Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
7
Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine,Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston,Massachusetts.
8
Department of Pharmacy,Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
9
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine,North Shore Medical Center,Salem, Massachusetts.
10
Pharmacy Department,North Shore Medical Center,Salem, Massachusetts.
11
Pharmacy Department,Brigham and Women's Faulkner Hospital,Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the safety of, and subsequent allergy documentation associated with, an antimicrobial stewardship intervention consisting of test-dose challenge procedures prompted by an electronic guideline for hospitalized patients with reported β-lactam allergies.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Large healthcare system consisting of 2 academic and 3 community acute-care hospitals between April 2016 and December 2017.

METHODS:

We evaluated β-lactam antibiotic test-dose outcomes, including adverse drug reactions (ADRs), hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), and electronic health record (EHR) allergy record updates. HSR predictors were examined using a multivariable logistic regression model. Modification of the EHR allergy record after test doses considered relevant allergy entries added, deleted, and/or specified.

RESULTS:

We identified 1,046 test-doses: 809 (77%) to cephalosporins, 148 (14%) to penicillins, and 89 (9%) to carbapenems. Overall, 78 patients (7.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9%-9.2%) had signs or symptoms of an ADR, and 40 (3.8%; 95% CI, 2.8%-5.2%) had confirmed HSRs. Most HSRs occurred at the second (ie, full-dose) step (68%) and required no treatment beyond drug discontinuation (58%); 3 HSR patients were treated with intramuscular epinephrine. Reported cephalosporin allergy history was associated with an increased odds of HSR (odds ratio [OR], 2.96; 95% CI, 1.34-6.58). Allergies were updated for 474 patients (45%), with records specified (82%), deleted (16%), and added (8%).

CONCLUSION:

This antimicrobial stewardship intervention using β-lactam test-dose procedures was safe. Overall, 3.8% of patients with β-lactam allergy histories had an HSR; cephalosporin allergy histories conferred a 3-fold increased risk. Encouraging EHR documentation might improve this safe, effective, and practical acute-care antibiotic stewardship tool.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center