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BMC Res Notes. 2019 Mar 25;12(1):167. doi: 10.1186/s13104-019-4200-9.

Internal consistency and factor structure of a brief scale assessing sensitivity to blood, injury, and mutilation.

Author information

1
Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD, 20814, USA.
2
Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD, 20814, USA. robert.ursano@usuhs.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

US Army soldiers and military veterans experience high rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, PTSD risk factors are not fully understood. Sensitivity to blood, injury, and mutilation (SBIM), which includes fear of being injured, seeing another person injured, and exposure to mutilation-relevant stimuli (e.g., blood, wounds) may be a PTSD risk factor that is identifiable prior to trauma exposure. Building on previous research that used a subset of items from the Mutilation Questionnaire (MQ), the aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of two brief scales assessing SBIM.

RESULTS:

Data from two independent samples of male, US Army soldiers, was utilized to examine a brief 10-item SBIM measure (MQ-SBIM-10) and a shorter version 5-item SBIM measure (MQ-SBIM-5). Internal consistency was indexed by the Kuder-Richardson 20 formula. Construct validity was assessed using confirmatory factor analysis and results obtained from each sample, and from a combined sample. The MQ-SBIM-10 demonstrated acceptable internal consistency and the hypothesized one-factor structure. Although the MQ-SBIM-5 explained a substantial amount of the variance in the 10-item measure and had a one-factor structure, internal consistency of the 5-item measure was poor. Analyses supported the MQ-SBIM-10 as a reliable and cohesive measure of sensitivity to blood, injury, and mutilation.

KEYWORDS:

Assessment; Mental health; Mutilation Questionnaire (MQ); Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); Risk factor; Sensitivity to blood, injury and mutilation (SBIM); Soldiers

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