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J Infect Chemother. 2019 Jun;25(6):413-422. doi: 10.1016/j.jiac.2019.02.021. Epub 2019 Mar 21.

Second nationwide surveillance of bacterial pathogens in patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis conducted by Japanese Surveillance Committee from 2015 to 2016: antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

Author information

1
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Blood Purification Center, Kagoshima University Hospital, Kagoshima, Japan. Electronic address: bass@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp.
2
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Infection Control and Laboratory Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
3
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University, Toyoake, Japan.
4
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu, Japan.
5
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.
6
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.
7
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, Chugoku Rosai Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan.
8
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan.
9
The Urogenital Sub-committee and the Surveillance Committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy (JSC), The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases (JAID and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology (JSCM), Tokyo, Japan; Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd, Japan.
10
The Surveillance Committee of JSC, JAID and JSCM, Tokyo, Japan.
11
The Surveillance Committee of JSC, JAID and JSCM, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Urology, The Jikei University Katsushika Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.
12
Infection Control Research Center, Kitasato University, Tokyo, Japan.
13
Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Hokkaido, Japan.
14
Department of Urology, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
15
Department of Urology, Nara Medical University, Nara, Japan.
16
Division of Urology, Department of Surgery Related Faculty of Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.
17
Department of Urology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.
18
Department of Urology, Institute of Biomedical & Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan.
19
Ito Urology Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.
20
Tomakomai Urology and Cardiology Clinic, Hokkaido, Japan.
21
iClinic, Miyagi, Japan.
22
Takeuchi Urology and Dermatology Clinic, Gifu, Japan.
23
Narita Clinic, Aichi, Japan.
24
Izumitani Fureai Clinic, Aichi, Japan.
25
Nishimura Urology Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.
26
Kawahara Urology Clinic, Kagoshima, Japan.
27
Department of Urology, Tsujinaka Hospital Kashiwanoha, Chiba, Japan.
28
Hosobe Clinic, Tokyo, Japan.
29
Takashima Urology Clinic, Nara, Japan.
30
Cyokyu Tenma Clinic, Hyogo, Japan.
31
Matsumura Urology Clinic, Hyogo, Japan.
32
Ihara Clinic, Hyogo, Japan.
33
Hirajima Clinic, Okayama, Japan.
34
Araki Urological Clinic, Okayama, Japan.
35
Sumii Clinic, Hiroshima, Japan.
36
Kawai Urology Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.
37
Ootemachi Clinic, Kagoshima, Japan.
38
Nissin Urological Clinic, Hokkaido, Japan.
39
Yoshioka Urology Clinic, Hyogo, Japan.
40
Kadena Urological Clinic, Hiroshima, Japan.
41
Department of Urology, Kagoshima Prefectural Ohshima Hospital, Kagoshima, Japan.
42
Nishi Urology and Dermatology Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.
43
Department of Urology, Tane General Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
44
Shirane Urology Clinic, Hiroshima, Japan.
45
Yoh Urology and Dermatology Clinic, Aichi, Japan.
46
Department of Urology, Saiseikai Chuwa Hospital, Nara, Japan.
47
Makinose Urological Clinic, Kagoshima, Japan.
48
Remedy Kitakyushu Nephro Clinic, Fukuoka, Japan.
49
Department of Urology, Fuji City Genaral Hospital, Shizuoka, Japan.

Abstract

The Japanese Surveillance Committee conducted a second nationwide surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of uropathogens responsible for acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) in premenopausal patients aged 16-40 years old at 31 hospitals throughout Japan from March 2015 to February 2016. In this study, the susceptibility of causative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus saprophyticus) for various antimicrobial agents was investigated by isolation and culturing of organisms obtained from urine samples. In total, 324 strains were isolated from 361 patients, including E. coli (n = 220, 67.9%), S. saprophyticus (n = 36, 11.1%), and K. pneumoniae (n = 7, 2.2%). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 20 antibacterial agents for these strains were determined according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) manual. At least 93% of the E. coli isolates showed susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins, whereas 100% of the S. saprophyticus isolates showed susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. The proportions of fluoroquinolone-resistant and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli strains were 6.4% (13/220) and 4.1% (9/220), respectively. The antimicrobial susceptibility of K. pneumoniae was retained during the surveillance period, while no multidrug-resistant strains were identified. In summary, antimicrobial susceptibility results of our second nationwide surveillance did not differ significantly from those of the first surveillance. Especially the numbers of fluoroquinolone-resistant and ESBL-producing E. coli strains were not increased in premenopausal patients with AUC in Japan.

KEYWORDS:

Acute uncomplicated cystitis; Resistance; Surveillance; Susceptibility

PMID:
30905628
DOI:
10.1016/j.jiac.2019.02.021
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