Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Lett. 2019 Jun 28;452:71-78. doi: 10.1016/j.canlet.2019.03.007. Epub 2019 Mar 20.

Metabolomics of neonatal blood spots reveal distinct phenotypes of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and potential effects of early-life nutrition.

Author information

1
The Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Environmental Health Science Laboratory, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
2
Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
3
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
4
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
5
Division of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
6
Division of Physiological Chemistry 2, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
The Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Environmental Health Science Laboratory, Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
8
Division of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Department of Statistics, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
9
Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Center for Integrative Research on Childhood Leukemia and the Environment, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. Electronic address: srappaport@berkeley.edu.

Abstract

Early-life exposures are believed to influence the incidence of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Archived neonatal blood spots (NBS), collected within the first days of life, offer a means to investigate small molecules that reflect early-life exposures. Using untargeted metabolomics, we compared abundances of small-molecule features in extracts of NBS punches from 332 children that later developed ALL and 324 healthy controls. Subjects were stratified by early (1-5 y) and late (6-14 y) diagnosis. Mutually-exclusive sets of metabolic features - representing putative lipids and fatty acids - were associated with ALL, including 9 and 19 metabolites in the early- and late-diagnosis groups, respectively. In the late-diagnosis group, a prominent cluster of features with apparent 18:2 fatty-acid chains suggested that newborn exposure to the essential nutrient, linoleic acid, increased ALL risk. Interestingly, abundances of these putative 18:2 lipids were greater in infants who were fed formula rather than breast milk (colostrum) and increased with the mother's pre-pregnancy body mass index. These results suggest possible etiologic roles of newborn nutrition in late-diagnosis ALL.

KEYWORDS:

Breastfeeding; Lipids; Maternal BMI; Pre-B ALL; t(12;21) translocation

PMID:
30904619
PMCID:
PMC6499387
[Available on 2020-06-28]
DOI:
10.1016/j.canlet.2019.03.007

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center