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AIDS Behav. 2020 Jan;24(1):1-4. doi: 10.1007/s10461-019-02470-3.

Public Health, HIV Care and Prevention, Human Rights and Democracy at a Crossroad in Brazil.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Quantitative Methods in Health, Sergio Arouca National School of Public Health (DEMQS-ENSP), FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro State (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
3
Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Durham, NC, USA.
4
Public Health Nursing Department, Rio de Janeiro State University (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
5
Division of Equity, Gender and Population, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. monica.malta@camh.ca.
6
Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH), Toronto, Canada. monica.malta@camh.ca.
7
Social Science Department, Sergio Arouca National School of Public Health (DCS/ENSP), FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. monica.malta@camh.ca.

Abstract

On January 2019, Brazil's new far-right president Jair Bolsonaro was sworn into office. Bolsonaro's administration supports downsizing the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS), while increasing the size of the private health sector. The new administration might leave millions of Brazilians without medical care, including hundreds of thousands of people living with HIV/AIDS. Bolsonaro's administration, allied with a highly conservative Congress and sharp decreases in federal funding for public health, education and research, could jeopardize key health and human rights strategies focused on women, LGBTQ + individuals, Indigenous populations, and people living with HIV/AIDS.

KEYWORDS:

Brazil; Democracy; HIV/AIDS; Human rights; Public health

PMID:
30903450
PMCID:
PMC6755066
[Available on 2021-01-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-019-02470-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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