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Malar J. 2019 Mar 22;18(1):93. doi: 10.1186/s12936-019-2724-z.

The past, present and future of anti-malarial medicines.

Author information

1
School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. etse6978@uni.sydney.edu.au.
2
School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.
3
School of Chemistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. matthew.todd@ucl.ac.uk.
4
School of Pharmacy, University College London, London, WC1N 1AX, United Kingdom. matthew.todd@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Great progress has been made in recent years to reduce the high level of suffering caused by malaria worldwide. Notably, the use of insecticide-treated mosquito nets for malaria prevention and the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for malaria treatment have made a significant impact. Nevertheless, the development of resistance to the past and present anti-malarial drugs highlights the need for continued research to stay one step ahead. New drugs are needed, particularly those with new mechanisms of action. Here the range of anti-malarial medicines developed over the years are reviewed, beginning with the discovery of quinine in the early 1800s, through to modern day ACT and the recently-approved tafenoquine. A number of new potential anti-malarial drugs currently in development are outlined, along with a description of the hit to lead campaign from which it originated. Finally, promising novel mechanisms of action for these and future anti-malarial medicines are outlined.

KEYWORDS:

Drug development; Drug discovery; Malaria; Mechanism of action; Plasmodium

PMID:
30902052
PMCID:
PMC6431062
DOI:
10.1186/s12936-019-2724-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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