Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Bot. 2019 Mar;106(3):453-468. doi: 10.1002/ajb2.1257. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

Constituents of a mixed-ploidy population of Solidago altissima differ in plasticity and predicted response to selection under simulated climate change.

Author information

1
Department of Biology, University of Minnesota Duluth, 1035 Kirby Drive, Duluth, Minnesota, 55812, USA.

Abstract

PREMISE OF THE STUDY:

Polyploids possess unique attributes that influence their environmental tolerance and geographic distribution. It is often unknown, however, whether cytotypes within mixed-ploidy populations are also uniquely adapted and differ in their responses to environmental change. Here, we examine whether diploids and hexaploids from a single mixed-ploidy population of Solidago altissima differ in plasticity and potential response to natural selection under conditions simulating climate change.

METHODS:

Clonal replicates of diploid and hexaploid genotypes were grown in a randomized split-plot design under two temperature (+1.9°C) and two watering treatments (-13% soil moisture) implemented with open-top passive chambers placed under rainout shelters. Physiological, phenological, morphological traits, and a fitness correlate, reproductive biomass, were measured and compared among treatments.

KEY RESULTS:

Differences in traits suggest that diploids are currently better adapted to low- water availability than hexaploids. Both ploidy levels had adaptive plastic responses to treatments and are predicted to respond to selection, but often for different traits. Water availability generally had a stronger effect than temperature, but for some traits the effect of water depended on temperature.

CONCLUSIONS:

Diploid and hexaploid S. altissima may maintain fitness in the short term through adaptive plasticity and evolution depending on which traits are important in a warmer, drier environment. Hexaploids may be at a disadvantage compared to diploids because fewer traits were heritable. Our results underscore the importance of studying combinations of climate variables that are predicted to change simultaneously.

KEYWORDS:

Asteraceae; climate change; elevated temperature; heritability; natural selection; plasticity; polyploidy

PMID:
30901496
DOI:
10.1002/ajb2.1257

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center