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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 Mar 22:e1801157. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201801157. [Epub ahead of print]

EPA+DHA, but not ALA Improved Lipids and Inflammation Status in Hypercholesterolemic Adults: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510182, People's Republic of China.
2
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, People's Republic of China.
3
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Research, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 510515, People's Republic of China.
4
Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangzhou, 511430, People's Republic of China.
5
Food Safety and Health Research Center, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Research, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University.
6
Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510120, People's Republic of China.
7
Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510080, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

SCOPE:

To compare the effects of supplementary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) versus α-linolenic acid (ALA) administered as capsules on lipid profiles, inflammatory status, and fatty acid composition of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in hypercholesterolemic adults.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We conducted a randomized, controlled, double-blind trial. A total of 123 hypercholesterolemic subjects aged 53.3 ± 5.2 years were randomly divided into 5 groups to receive (1) control oil; (2) low ALA, 4.2 g/d; (3) high ALA, 7.2 g/d; (4) low DHA+EPA, 1.8 g/d; or (5) high EPA+DHA, 3.6 g/d for 12 weeks. Lipid profiles were detected, and the fatty acid composition of PBMCs was measured. In vitro production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by PBMCs was also determined. After the intervention, subjects who received a low and high dose of DHA+EPA experienced a 11.99% and 15.78% decrease in triglycerides. This change was significantly different from that of the control group (P < 0.05). The in vitro study indicated that supplementation of high-dose DHA+EPA induced the greatest decrease of IL-6 production by PBMCs relative to other groups (P = 0.046). ALA intervention significantly increased the PBMCs composition of ALA but not EPA/DHA.

CONCLUSION:

EPA+DHA, but not ALA improved lipids and inflammation status in hypercholesterolemic adults. Supplementation of ALA did not increase the PBMCs composition of EPA/DHA in middle-aged to elderly Chinese. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

docosahexaenoic acid; eicosapentaenoic acid; inflammation; lipids; randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial; α-linolenic acid

PMID:
30900815
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201801157

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