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Kidney Int. 2019 May;95(5):1209-1224. doi: 10.1016/j.kint.2018.12.018. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Health-related quality of life in glomerular disease.

Collaborators (220)

Ahn W, Appel GB, Babayev R, Batal I, Bomback AS, Brown E, Campenot ES, Canetta P, Carlassara L, Chan B, Chatterjee D, D'Agati VD, Delbarba E, Dogra S, Fernandez H, Foroncewicz B, Gharavi AG, Ghiggeri GM, Hines WH, Husain SA, Jain NG, Khairallah P, Kil BH, Kiryluk K, Jeyabalan A, Lau WL, Lin F, Lugani F, Marasa M, Markowitz G, Mohan S, Mu X, Mucha K, Nickolas TL, Piva S, Radhakrishnan J, Rao MK, Renu RS, Sanna-Cherchi S, Santoriello D, Shirazian S, Stokes MB, Uy N, Valeri AM, Greenbaum LA, Smoyer WE, Al-Uzri A, Ambruzs J, Ashoor I, Aviles D, Baracco R, Barcia J, Bartosh S, Belsha C, Bowers C, Braun MC, Cai Y, Chernitskiy V, Chishti A, Claes D, Clark K, Cramer C, Davis K, Erkan E, Feig D, Freundlich M, Gaut J, Gbadegesin R, Hanna M, Hidalgo G, Hooper D, Hunley TE, Jain A, Kallash M, Kamel M, Khalid M, Klein JB, Kump T, Lane JC, Liapis H, Mahan J, Nester C, Pan C, Patterson L, Patel H, Raad A, Revell A, Rheault MN, Silva C, Sreedharan R, Srivastava T, Steinke J, Sumner S, Twombley K, Wenderfer SE, Vasylyeva TL, Wang CS, Weaver DJ, Wong CS, Yin H, Achanti A, Almaani S, Ayoub I, Budisavljevic M, D'Angelo M, Fatima H, Falk R, Fogo A, Gibson K, Glenn D, Hogan S, Jennette JC, Julian B, Kidd J, Laurin LP, Massey HD, Mottl A, Murphy S, Nachman P, Nadasdy T, Novak J, Parikh S, Poulton C, Powell TB, Reeve B, Renfrow M, Reynolds M, Rizk D, Rovin B, Royal V, Sanghani N, Self S, Adler S, Alachkar N, Alpers C, Matar RB, Avila-Casado C, Bagnasco S, Brede E, Brown E, Cattran D, Choi M, Dell KM, Dewalt D, Denburg M, Dukkipati R, Fervenza FC, Fornoni A, Gadegbeku C, Gipson P, Gonzalez-Zea A, Hasely L, Hendren E, Hingorani S, Hladunewich M, Hogan J, Holzman LB, Hou J, Jefferson JA, Jhaveri K, Johnstone DB, Kaskel F, Kogan A, Kopp J, Lafayette R, Lemley KV, Malaga-Dieguez L, Meyers K, Neu A, O'Shaughnessy MM, O'Toole JF, Oliverio A, Palmer M, Parekh R, Pitter R, Reich H, Reidy K, Rondon H, Sambandam KK, Sampson M, Sedor JR, Selewski DT, Sethna CB, Schelling J, Sperati JC, Swiatecka-Urban A, Trachtman H, Tuttle KR, Waldman M, Weisstuch J, Wiggins R, Williams D, Winkler C, Vento S, Young E, Zhdanova O, Barisoni L, Beil C, Eikstadt R, Gillespie B, Gipson DS, Graff J, Hewitt S, Hill-Callahan P, Helmuth M, Herreshoff E, Kretzler M, Lienczewski C, Mansfield S, Mariani L, McCullough K, Moore N, Nast CC, Robinson BM, Sexton M, Troost J, Wladkowski M, Zee J, Zinsser D, Guay-Woodford LM.

Author information

1
Division of Nephrology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address: pac2004@cumc.columbia.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
4
Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
5
Division of Pediatric Nephrology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
6
Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Helen DeVos Children's Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA.
7
Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA.
8
Division of Nephrology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA.
9
Department of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
11
Department of Nephrology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
12
Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Cohen Children's Medical Center, New Hyde Park, New York, USA.
13
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Kansas City, Missouri, USA.
14
Division of Nephrology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Spokane, Washington, USA.
15
Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
16
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Kidney Center, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.
17
Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
18
Division of Nephrology, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
19
Renal-Electrolyte and Hypertension Division, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
20
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
21
Department of Nephrology, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, USA; Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
22
Deparment of Nephrology, Center for Translational Science, Children's National Health System, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.

Abstract

There is scant literature describing the effect of glomerular disease on health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The Cure Glomerulonephropathy study (CureGN) is an international longitudinal cohort study of children and adults with four primary glomerular diseases (minimal change disease, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, membranous nephropathy, and IgA nephropathy). HRQOL is systematically assessed using items from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Informative System (PROMIS). We assessed the relationship between HRQOL and demographic and clinical variables in 478 children and 1115 adults at the time of enrollment into CureGN. Domains measured by PROMIS items included global assessments of health, mobility, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep impairment, as well as a derived composite measure incorporating all measured domains. Multivariable models were created that explained 7 to 32% of variance in HRQOL. Patient-reported edema consistently had the strongest and most robust association with each measured domain of HRQOL in multivariable analysis (adjusted β [95% CI] for composite PROMIS score in children, -5.2 [-7.1 to -3.4]; for composite PROMIS score in adults, -6.1 [-7.4 to -4.9]). Female sex, weight (particularly obesity), and estimated glomerular filtration rate were also associated with some, but not all, domains of HRQOL. Primary diagnosis, disease duration, and exposure to immunosuppression were not associated with HRQOL after adjustment. Sensitivity analyses and interaction testing demonstrated no significant association between disease duration or immunosuppression and any measured domain of HRQOL. Thus, patient-reported edema has a consistent negative association with HRQOL in patients with primary glomerular diseases, with substantially greater impact than other demographic and clinical variables.

KEYWORDS:

edema; health-related quality of life; patient-reported outcomes; primary glomerular disease

PMID:
30898342
DOI:
10.1016/j.kint.2018.12.018

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