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Neurosurg Clin N Am. 2019 Apr;30(2):219-230. doi: 10.1016/j.nec.2018.12.005.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Epilepsy.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1500 21st Avenue South, 4340 Village at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 37232-8618, USA; Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1500 21st Avenue South, 4340 Village at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 37232-8618, USA. Electronic address: hernan.gonzalez@vanderbilt.edu.
2
Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1121 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North, T4224, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1500 21st Avenue South, 4340 Village at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 37232-8618, USA; Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1500 21st Avenue South, 4340 Village at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 37232-8618, USA; Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1500 21st Avenue South, 4340 Village at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 37232-8618, USA; Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 1500 21st Avenue South, 4340 Village at Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN 37232-8618, USA.

Abstract

Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) was the first neuromodulation device approved for treatment of epilepsy. In more than 20 years of study, VNS has consistently demonstrated efficacy in treating epilepsy. After 2 years, approximately 50% of patients experience at least 50% reduced seizure frequency. Adverse events with VNS treatment are rare and include surgical adverse events (including infection, vocal cord paresis, and so forth) and stimulation side effects (hoarseness, voice change, and cough). Future developments in VNS, including closed-loop and noninvasive stimulation, may reduce side effects or increase efficacy of VNS.

KEYWORDS:

Epilepsy; Epilepsy surgery; Neuromodulation; Seizures; Vagus nerve stimulator

PMID:
30898273
PMCID:
PMC6432928
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.nec.2018.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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