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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019 Mar 21. pii: jc.2018-02713. doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-02713. [Epub ahead of print]

Particulate Air Pollution Exposure and Plasma Vitamin D Levels in Pregnant Women: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Child Health Care, Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital of Yangzhou, Affiliated Hospital of Medical College Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, China.
3
Department of Biostatistics, University of Washington, Seattle, USA.
4
Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

No studies have assessed the associations between air pollution exposure and vitamin D status in pregnant women.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the association between particulate air pollution exposure and circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] levels in pregnant women.

DESIGN:

A longitudinal cohort study.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 3285 pregnant women were recruited at a Maternal and Child Health Hospital.

INTERVENTIONS:

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Serum 25(OH)D levels.

RESULTS:

We observed trimester-specific associations between particulate air pollution exposure and circulating 25(OH)D levels. The associations were most pronounced for the periods of third trimester and the entire pregnancy. A 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and PM10 exposure during the entire pregnancy was associated with a 4.62% (95% CI, -6.31% to -2.93%) and 5.06% (95% CI, -6.50% to -3.62%) decrease in 25(OH)D levels, respectively. Particulate air pollution exposure was also associated with elevated odds of maternal vitamin D deficiency. A 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and PM10 exposure during the entire pregnancy was associated with a 45% (OR=1.45, 95% CI, 1.29 to 1.63) and 48% (OR=1.48, 95% CI, 1.33 to 1.64) increase in the odds of maternal vitamin D deficiency. Mediation analysis estimated that decreased solar UVB radiation mediated 69.5% and 66.4% of the inverse association between PM2.5 and PM10 exposure and circulating 25(OH)D levels.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that prenatal exposure to particulate air pollution may play an independent role in maternal vitamin D deficiency. The role of air pollution should be incorporated into future guidelines for the prevention of maternal vitamin D deficiency.

PMID:
30896756
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2018-02713

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