Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mol Genet Genomic Med. 2019 Mar 20:e636. doi: 10.1002/mgg3.636. [Epub ahead of print]

IGNITE network: Response of patients to genomic medicine interventions.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine and the Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
2
School of Medicine & Public Health, William S Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin.
3
Department of Population Health Sciences and Policy and the Center for Health Equity and Community Engaged Research, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
4
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research and Center for Pharmacogenomics, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
5
Department of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland.
6
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana.
7
Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee.
8
Nicklaus Children's Research Institute, Nicklaus Children's Hospital, Miami, Florida.
9
National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The IGNITE network funds six genomic medicine projects. Though interventions varied, we hypothesized that synergies across projects could be leveraged to better understand the participant experiences with genomic medicine interventions. Therefore, we performed cross-network analyses to identify associations between participant demographics and attitudes toward the intervention (attitude), plan to share results (share), and quality of life (QOL).

METHODS:

Data collection for demographics, attitude, share, and QOL surveys were standardized across projects. Recruitment and survey administration varied by each project's protocol.

RESULTS:

Participants (N = 6,817) were 67.2% (N = 4,584) female, and 37.4% (N = 3,544) were minority. Mean age = 54.0 (sd 14.a). Younger participants were as follows: (1) more positive in attitude pre-intervention (1.15-fold decrease/10-year age increase (OR)) and more negative after (1.14-fold increase OR); (2) higher in QOL pre-intervention (1.07-fold increase OR) and postintervention; (3) more likely to share results (1.12-fold increase OR). Race was significant when sharing results (white participants increased OR = 1.88), but not for change in QOL pre-postintervention or attitude.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of this approach and identified a few key themes which are as follows: age was consistently significant across the three outcomes, whereas race had less of an impact than expected. However, these are only associations and thus warrant further study.

KEYWORDS:

IGNITE; attitude; common measures; genomic medicine; plan to share; quality of life

PMID:
30895746
DOI:
10.1002/mgg3.636
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center