Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Open Forum Infect Dis. 2019 Mar 15;6(Suppl 1):S79-S94. doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofy358. eCollection 2019 Mar.

Twenty Years of the SENTRY Antifungal Surveillance Program: Results for Candida Species From 1997-2016.

Author information

1
JMI Laboratories, North Liberty, Iowa.
2
University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa.
3
Departments of Pathology and Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia.

Abstract

Background:

The emergence of antifungal resistance threatens effective treatment of invasive fungal infection (IFI). Invasive candidiasis is the most common health care-associated IFI. We evaluated the activity of fluconazole (FLU) against 20 788 invasive isolates of Candida (37 species) collected from 135 medical centers in 39 countries (1997-2016). The activity of anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin (MCF) was evaluated against 15 308 isolates worldwide (2006-2016).

Methods:

Species identification was accomplished using phenotypic (1997-2001), genotypic, and proteomic methods (2006-2016). All isolates were tested using reference methods and clinical breakpoints published in the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute documents.

Results:

A decrease in the isolation of Candida albicans and an increase in the isolation of Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis were observed over time. Candida glabrata was the most common non-C. albicans species detected in all geographic regions except for Latin America, where C. parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis were more common. Six Candida auris isolates were detected: 1 each in 2009, 2013, 2014, and 2015 and 2 in 2016; all were from nosocomial bloodstream infections and were FLU-resistant (R). The highest rates of FLU-R isolates were seen in C. glabrata from North America (NA; 10.6%) and in C. tropicalis from the Asia-Pacific region (9.2%). A steady increase in isolation of C. glabrata and resistance to FLU was detected over 20 years in the United States. Echinocandin-R (EC-R) ranged from 3.5% for C. glabrata to 0.1% for C. albicans and C. parapsilosis. Resistance to MCF was highest among C. glabrata (2.8%) and C. tropicalis (1.3%) from NA. Mutations on FKS hot spot (HS) regions were detected among 70 EC-R isolates (51/70 were C. glabrata). Most isolates harboring FKS HS mutations were resistant to 2 or more ECs.

Conclusions:

EC-R and FLU-R remain uncommon among contemporary Candida isolates; however, a slow and steady emergence of resistance to both antifungal classes was observed in C. glabrata and C. tropicalis isolates.

KEYWORDS:

Candida; SENTRY; surveillance

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center