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Sci Rep. 2019 Mar 19;9(1):4849. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-41086-4.

Risk Factors for Delayed Isolation of Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis in an Acute-care Hospital.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, 04401, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, 04401, Republic of Korea.
3
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Seoul Hospital, Seoul, 04401, Republic of Korea. sypark@schmc.ac.kr.

Abstract

The objective of the current study was to determine the factors associated with delayed isolation of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). In this retrospective study, data of patients newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB from January 2015 through December 2017 at a referral hospital were reviewed. Delayed recognition of pulmonary TB was defined as failure to initiate airborne isolation within the first 3 days of admission. We analyzed the clinical, microbiological, and radiological factors associated with delayed isolation of pulmonary TB. A total of 134 patients with positive sputum acid-fast bacilli (AFB) cultures were analyzed, of which 44 (33%) were isolated within 3 days after admission. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, older age (p = 0.01), admission to departments other than Infectious Disease or Pulmonology (p = 0.005), and presence of malignancy (p = 0.02) were associated with delayed isolation. Patients with a radiologic diagnosis of active pulmonary TB were likely to be isolated early (p = 0.01). Better awareness of pulmonary TB among attending practitioners in hospital settings is required. Delay in isolation is associated with older age, malignancy, hospitalization to departments other than Infectious Disease or Pulmonology, and non-confident radiologic diagnosis of active pulmonary TB.

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