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Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2019 Jul 15;175:58-65. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.03.039. Epub 2019 Mar 16.

Mineral elements uptake and physiological response of Amaranthus mangostanus (L.) as affected by biochar.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering/Sino-Canada R&D Centre on Water and Environmental Safety, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China.
2
Key Laboratory of Pollution Processes and Environmental Criteria, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering/Sino-Canada R&D Centre on Water and Environmental Safety, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071, China. Electronic address: wangcp@nankai.edu.cn.
3
Department of Analytical Chemistry, The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT 06504, United States. Electronic address: chuanxin.ma@ct.gov.
4
Stockbridge School of Agriculture, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, United States.

Abstract

Amaranthus mangostanus L. (amaranth) was hydroponically grown in different concentrations of biochar amended nutrient solution to investigate the mineral elements migration and physiological response of amaranth as affected by biochar. Our results showed that exposure to 26.6 g/L of biochar greatly increased the root and shoot K, Na and Al content, while 2.6 g/L of biochar greatly increased the root Ca and Mg content. The uptake of K and Al notably altered other elements' accumulation in shoots and roots upon the biochar exposure. The ratio of Ca: K in shoots and Mg: K in roots were negatively correlated to the biochar concentrations, while the ratio of Al: Ca and Al: Mg in roots were positively related to the biochar concentrations. The Al: Fe ratio was also polynomial correlated to the concentrations of biochar. The addition of biochar beyond 2.6 g/L resulted in the cell membrane and DNA damages in roots. The activity of SOD and CAT in 6.7 g/L biochar treated roots was significantly elevated as compared to the ones in other biochar treatments and was almost 2-fold of the control. The photosynthetic Fv/Fm intensity and subcellular structure in leaves were also compromised upon exposure to 26.6 g/L biochar. Taken together, biochar could significantly alter the mineral migration in amaranth and physiologically damage in the plants. It is essential to study the effect of biochar within appropriate concentrations on plants prior to wide application in agriculture.

KEYWORDS:

Amaranthus mangostanus; Biochar; Mineral elements migration; Physiological response

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