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Am J Phys Anthropol. 2019 Mar 19. doi: 10.1002/ajpa.23823. [Epub ahead of print]

The massive assimilation of indigenous East Asian populations in the origin of Muslim Hui people inferred from paternal Y chromosome.

Author information

1
MOE Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology and Collaborative Innovation Center of Genetics and Development, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Anthropology and Ethnology, Institute of Anthropology, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.
3
International Medical Anthropology Team, Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.
4
Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Key Laboratory of Computational Biology, Max Planck Independent Research Group on Population Genomics, CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology (PICB), Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS, Shanghai, China.
5
Key Laboratory for Molecular Genetic Mechanisms and Intervention Research on High Altitude Disease of Tibet Autonomous Region, Key Laboratory of High Altitude Environment and Gene Related to Disease of Tibet, Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Xizang Minzu University, Xianyang, Shaanxi, China.
6
School of History and Culture, Minzu University of China, Beijing, China.
7
Research Center for Chinese Frontier Archaeology of Jilin University, Key Scientific Research Base of Physical Anthropology and Molecular Archaeology State Administration of Cultural Heritage, and the JLU-SFU Joint Laboratory for Bioarchaeological Research, Changchun, China.
8
Youjiang Medical University for Nationalities, Baise, Guangxi, China.
9
School of Forensic Medicine, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China.
10
Department of Human Anatomy and Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, China.
11
School of Forensic Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The Hui people are the adherents of Muslim faith and distributing throughout China. There are two contrasting hypotheses about the origin and diversification of the Hui people, namely, the demic diffusion involving the mass movement of people or simple cultural diffusion.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We collected 621 unrelated male individuals from 23 Hui populations all over China. We comprehensively genotyped more than 100 informative Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) on those samples.

RESULTS:

Co-analyzed with published worldwide populations, our results suggest the origin of Hui people has involved massive assimilation of indigenous East Asians with about 70% in total of the paternal ancestry could be traced back to East Asia and the left 30% to various regions in West Eurasia.

DISCUSSION:

The genetic structure of the extant Hui populations was primarily shaped by the indigenous East Asian populations as they contribute the majority part of the paternal lineages of Hui people. The West Eurasian admixture was probably a sex-biased male-driven process since we have not found such a high proportion of West Eurasian gene flow on autosomal STRs and maternal mtDNA.

KEYWORDS:

Hui people; Y chromosome; gene flow; population admixture

PMID:
30889274
DOI:
10.1002/ajpa.23823

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