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Curr Gastroenterol Rep. 2019 Mar 18;21(4):15. doi: 10.1007/s11894-019-0680-y.

Obesity, Motility, Diet, and Intestinal Microbiota-Connecting the Dots.

Author information

1
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.
2
Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. ssrini2@emory.edu.
3
Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA, USA. ssrini2@emory.edu.
4
Emory University, Rm 201, 615 Michael Street, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. ssrini2@emory.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The goal of the present review is to explore the relationship between dietary changes and alterations in gut microbiota that contribute to disorders of gut motility and obesity.

RECENT FINDINGS:

We review the microbiota changes that are seen in obesity, diarrhea, and constipation and look at potential mechanisms of how dysbiosis can predispose to these. We find that microbial metabolites, particularly short chain fatty acids, can lead to signaling changes in the host enterocytes. Microbial alteration leading to both motility disorders and obesity may be mediated by the release of hormones including glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 (GLP-1, GLP-2) and polypeptide YY (PYY). These pathways provide avenues for microbiota-targeted interventions that can treat both disorders of motility and obesity. In summary, multiple mechanisms contribute to the interplay between the microbial dysbiosis, obesity, and dysmotility.

KEYWORDS:

Constipation; Diarrhea; Dysmotility; Gut microbiome; Obesity

PMID:
30887257
DOI:
10.1007/s11894-019-0680-y

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