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Neurosci Bull. 2019 Mar 18. doi: 10.1007/s12264-019-00360-1. [Epub ahead of print]

Effect of Apolipoprotein E Genotypes on Huntington's Disease Phenotypes in a Han Chinese Population.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology and Research Center of Neurology in the Second Affiliated Hospital, and Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, 310009, China.
2
Department of Neurology and Institute of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, 350005, China.
3
Department of Neurology and Institute of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200041, China.
4
Department of Neurology and Research Center of Neurology in the Second Affiliated Hospital, and Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, 310009, China. lihonglei@zju.edu.cn.
5
Department of Neurology and Research Center of Neurology in the Second Affiliated Hospital, and Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, 310009, China. zhiyingwu@zju.edu.cn.
6
Joint Institute for Genetics and Genome Medicine between Zhejiang University and University of Toronto, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310009, China. zhiyingwu@zju.edu.cn.

Abstract

Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant degenerative disease that mainly encompasses movement, cognition, and behavioral symptoms. The apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is thought to be associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we enrolled a cohort of 223 unrelated Han Chinese patients with HD and 1241 unrelated healthy controls in Southeastern China and analyzed the correlation between APOE genotypes and HD phenotypes. The results showed that the frequency of the E4 allele (7.1%) in HD patients was statistically less than that in controls (12.0%) (P =0.004). In addition, we divided patients into motor-onset and non-motor-onset groups, and analyzed the relationship with APOE genotypes. The results, however, were negative. Furthermore, the age at onset (AAO), defined as the age at the onset of motor symptoms, was compared in each APOE genotype subgroup and multivariate regression analysis was used to exclude the interference of CAG repeat length on AAO, but no association was found between APOE genotypes and AAO. Finally, we analyzed adult-onset HD to exclude the interference caused by juvenile HD (n = 13), and the results were negative. Therefore, our study suggests that APOE may not be a genetic modifier for HD, especially for adult-onset HD among Chinese of Han ethnicity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of the correlation between APOE genotypes and HD phenotypes in a Han Chinese population.

KEYWORDS:

Apolipoprotein E; Han Chinese population; Huntington’s disease; Phenotype

PMID:
30887245
DOI:
10.1007/s12264-019-00360-1

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