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Nat Immunol. 2019 May;20(5):602-612. doi: 10.1038/s41590-019-0342-0. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Lymph node conduits transport virions for rapid T cell activation.

Author information

1
Viral Immunity and Pathogenesis Unit, Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
2
Genetic Engineering Section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
3
Cell Biology Section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
4
Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH, USA.
5
Department of Pathology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH, USA.
6
Cell Biology Section, Laboratory of Viral Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. jwyewdell@nih.gov.
7
Viral Immunity and Pathogenesis Unit, Laboratory of Clinical Immunology and Microbiology, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. hhickman@nih.gov.

Abstract

Despite intense interest in antiviral T cell priming, the routes by which virions move in lymph nodes (LNs) are imperfectly understood. Current models fail to explain how virus-infected cells rapidly appear within the LN interior after viral infection. To better understand virion trafficking in the LN, we determined the locations of virions and infected cells after administration to mice of vaccinia virus or Zika virus. Notably, many rapidly infected cells in the LN interior were adjacent to LN conduits. Through the use of confocal and electron microscopy, we clearly visualized virions within conduits. Functionally, CD8+ T cells rapidly and preferentially associated with vaccinia virus-infected cells in the LN paracortex, which led to T cell activation in the LN interior. These results reveal that it is possible for even large virions to flow through LN conduits and infect dendritic cells within the T cell zone to prime CD8+ T cells.

PMID:
30886418
PMCID:
PMC6474694
DOI:
10.1038/s41590-019-0342-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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