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Food Sci Anim Resour. 2019 Feb;39(1):162-176. doi: 10.5851/kosfa.2019.e13. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Antioxidant Activity of Yogurt Fermented at Low Temperature and Its Anti-inflammatory Effect on DSS-induced Colitis in Mice.

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1
Department of Applied Animal Science, College of Animal Life Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 24341, Korea.

Abstract

This study was performed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of yogurt fermented at low temperature and the anti-inflammatory effect it has on induced colitis with 2.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in Balb/c mice. Yogurt premix were fermented with a commercial starter culture containing Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus at different temperatures: 22°C (low fermentation temperature) for 27 h and 37°C (general fermentation temperature) for 12 h. To measure antioxidant activity of yogurt samples, DPPH, ABTS+ and ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) assays were conducted. For animal experiments, inflammation was induced with 2.5% DSS in Balb/c mice. Yogurt fermented at low temperature showed higher antioxidant activity than that of the yogurt fermented at general temperature. In the inflammatory study, IL-6 (interleukin 6) was decreased and IL-4 and IL-10 increased significantly in DSS group with yogurt fermented at general temperature (DYG) and that with yogurt fermented at low temperature (DYL) compared to that in DSS-induced colitic mice (DC), especially DYL had higher concentration of cytokines IL-4, and IL-10 than DYG. MPO (myeloperoxidase) tended to decrease more in treatments with yogurt than DC. Additionally, yogurt fermented at low temperature had anti-inflammatory activity, although there was no significant difference with general temperature-fermented yogurt (p>0.05).

KEYWORDS:

dextran sodium sulfate; inflammatory bowel diseases; low temperature fermentation; yogurt

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