Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Int. 2019 May;126:735-746. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.013. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Household dampness-related exposures in relation to childhood asthma and rhinitis in China: A multicentre observational study.

Author information

1
Joint International Research Laboratory of Green Buildings and Built Environments (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; National Centre for International Research of Low-carbon and Green Buildings (Ministry of Science and Technology), Chongqing University, Chongqing, China.
2
Joint International Research Laboratory of Green Buildings and Built Environments (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; National Centre for International Research of Low-carbon and Green Buildings (Ministry of Science and Technology), Chongqing University, Chongqing, China. Electronic address: baizhanli@cqu.edu.cn.
3
School of Architecture, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China.
4
School of Environment and Architecture, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai, China.
5
School of Public Health, Key Lab of Public Health Safety of the Ministry of Education, Key Lab of Health Technology Assessment, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
6
School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China.
7
College of Life Sciences, Central China Normal University, Wuhan, China.
8
Research Center for Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, China.
9
School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing, China.
10
School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
11
Joint International Research Laboratory of Green Buildings and Built Environments (Ministry of Education), Chongqing University, Chongqing, China; Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751, Sweden.
12
Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala SE-751, Sweden.

Abstract

During 2010-2012, we conducted an observational study on household environment and health outcomes among 40,010 preschool children from seven cities of China. Here we examined associations of six dampness-related indicators (visible mold spots, visible damp stains, damp clothing and/or bedding, water damage, condensation on windowpane, moldy odor) in the current residence and three dampness-related indicators (visible mold spots, condensation on windowpane, moldy odor) in the early residence with childhood asthma and rhinitis. In the multi-level logistic regression analyses, visible mold spots and visible damp stains in the current residence were significantly associated with the increased odds of doctor-diagnosed asthma and allergic rhinitis during lifetime-ever (adjusted odd ratios (AORs) range: 1.18-1.35). All dampness-related indicators were significantly associated with increased odds of wheeze and rhinitis during lifetime-ever and in the past 12 months (AORs range: 1.16-2.64). The cumulative numbers of damp indicators had positively dose-response relationships with the increased odds of the studied diseases. These associations for wheeze and rhinitis were similar between northern children and southern children. Similar results were found in the sensitive analyses among children without a family history of allergies and among children without asthma and allergic rhinitis. For 3-6 years-old children in mainland of China in 2011, we speculated that about 90,000 (2.02%) children with asthma and about 59,000 (1.09%) children with allergic rhinitis could be attributable to exposing to visible mold spots in the current residence. Our results suggested that early and lifetime exposures to household dampness indicators are risk factors for childhood asthma and rhinitis.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; Children; China; Dampness; Home; Rhinitis

PMID:
30878869
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.013
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center