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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2019 Jul;25(7):1374-1381. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.03.012. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Screening for Family Psychosocial Risk in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with the Psychosocial Assessment Tool.

Author information

1
Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.
2
Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children's of Alabama; Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham.
3
Center for Healthcare Delivery Science, Nemours Children's Health System; Sidney Kimmel Medical School at Thomas Jefferson University.
4
Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania.
5
Center for Healthcare Delivery Science, Nemours Children's Health System.
6
Sidney Kimmel Medical School at Thomas Jefferson University; Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Nemours Children's Health System.
7
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital.
8
Department of Family and Community Health, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing.
9
Center for Healthcare Delivery Science, Nemours Children's Health System; Department of Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical School at Thomas Jefferson University. Electronic address: kazakster@gmail.com.

Abstract

Family psychosocial risk screening is an important initial step in delivering evidence-based care in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). Establishing an evidence-based screening approach that is acceptable, reliable, and valid is an essential step in psychosocial care delivery. This is a 3-institution multimethod study. In part 1, caregivers of children about to undergo HCT (n = 140) completed the Psychosocial Assessment Tool-Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (PAT-HCT), a brief parent report screener adapted for HCT, and validating questionnaires. Families received feedback on their risks identified on the PAT-HCT. In part 2, 12 caregivers completed a semistructured interview about their perceptions of the PAT and the feedback process. The reliability and validity of the PAT-HCT total and subscale scores were tested using Kuder-Richardson-20 (KR-20) and Pearson correlations. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze the qualitative interview data. Internal consistency for the total score (KR-20 = .88) and the Child Problems, Sibling Problems, Family Problems, and Stress Reactions subscales were strong (KR-20 >.70). Family Structure, Social Support, and Family Beliefs subscales were adequate (KR-20 = .55 to .63). Moderate to strong correlations with the criteria measures provided validation for the total and subscale scores. Feedback was provided to 97.14% of the families who completed the PAT-HCT, and the mean rating of acceptability was >4.00 (on a 5-point scale). The qualitative data indicate that families appreciate the effort to provide screening and feedback. The PAT-HCT is a psychometrically sound screener for use in HCT. Feedback can be given to families. Both the screener and the feedback process are acceptable to caregivers.

KEYWORDS:

Families; HCT; Healthcare delivery; Pediatrics; Psychosocial; Psychosocial Assessment Tool (PAT); Risk screening

PMID:
30878608
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2019.03.012

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