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Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2019 Jun 15;174:683-689. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.03.029. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Uptake and translocation of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) by hydroponically grown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China.
2
Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China. Electronic address: hxzhao@dlut.edu.cn.

Abstract

The increasing load of organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) has generated wide concerns about their potential residues in aquatic environments. The uptake and translocation of fourteen OPFRs by wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were studied under hydroponic conditions. The results revealed that OPFRs were removed from hydroponic solution by wheat, and the removal processes followed first-order kinetics. After 10 days, the removal efficiencies were in a range of 57.9 ± 3.8%-63.8 ± 5.6%. The potential for translocation of these OPFRs from the roots to foliage was also assessed. OPFRs with relatively higher hydrophobicity were more likely taken up by roots, and OPFRs with lower hydrophobicity were more prone to be translocated. Root concentration factors (RCFs), transpiration stream concentration factors (TSCFs), and foliage/root concentration factors (FRCFs) were calculated. Furthermore, significant correlations were found between RCF, FRCF or TSCF values of OPFRs and log Kow (p < 0.05), and translocation of OPFRs depended on their physicochemical properties. The findings of this study develop better understanding of accumulation and translocation of OPFRs in plants, which is valuable for environmental and human health assessments of such kind of contaminants.

KEYWORDS:

Organophosphate esters; Phytoremediation; Removal efficiency; Root uptake

PMID:
30878008
DOI:
10.1016/j.ecoenv.2019.03.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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