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J Dent. 2019 May;84:55-59. doi: 10.1016/j.jdent.2019.03.005. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Dental and periodontal health in adults with eating disorders: A case-control study.

Author information

1
Department of Periodontology, Odontology Unit, AP-HP, GH Paris-Est, Rothschild Hospital, Paris, France; UFR of Odontology, University of Paris Diderot, 5 rue Garancière, Paris, France.
2
UFR of Odontology, University of Paris Diderot, 5 rue Garancière, Paris, France; Department of Restorative Dentistry, Odontology Unit, AP-HP, GH Paris-Est, Rothschild Hospital, Paris, France; UMR CNRS 5615 Lyon 1, France.
3
Department of Addictology, Eating Disorder Unit, AP-HP, GH Paris-Sud, Paul Brousse Hospital, Villejuif, France; CESP, INSERM U1178, Paris-Descartes University, Paris, France.
4
Department of Periodontology, Odontology Unit, AP-HP, GH Paris-Est, Rothschild Hospital, Paris, France; UFR of Odontology, University of Paris Diderot, 5 rue Garancière, Paris, France; Laboratory Orofacial Pathologies, Imaging and Biotherapies, EA 2496, Dental School, University of Paris Descartes, 1 rue Maurice Arnoux, 92120 Paris, France.
5
Department of Periodontology, Odontology Unit, AP-HP, GH Paris-Est, Rothschild Hospital, Paris, France; UFR of Odontology, University of Paris Diderot, 5 rue Garancière, Paris, France; Laboratory Orofacial Pathologies, Imaging and Biotherapies, EA 2496, Dental School, University of Paris Descartes, 1 rue Maurice Arnoux, 92120 Paris, France. Electronic address: helene.range@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study evaluates dental and periodontal health in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa patients.

METHODS:

Seventy females with eating disorders (36 anorexia nervosa) attending a public hospital Psychiatry and Addiction unit were compared with age-matched controls (n = 70). Full-mouth examination and oral hygiene behaviours were recorded for all participants.

RESULTS:

More frequent dental attendance and toothbrushing were observed in patients with eating disorders than in controls (p < 0.01), while lower plaque index and bleeding on probing were observed in controls than in patients (p ≤ 0.03). Percentages of sites with gingival recession >2 mm were higher in patients with eating disorders than in controls (2.3 ± 4.1 versus 0.0 ± 0.1, p < 0.01). The BEWE score >2 was significantly more frequent in bulimia nervosa patients than in anorexia nervosa patients (76.5% versus 41.7%, p < 0.01). Regarding periodontal parameters, mean plaque index, bleeding on probing and clinical attachment loss were increased in anorexia nervosa patients compared to bulimia nervosa patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present data suggest different oral health approaches in eating disorder patients according to diagnosis type.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

Periodontal and dental health should be considered rigorously in patients with eating disorders. Personalized oral hygiene recommendations and treatments can be delivered according to the type of eating disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Anorexia nervosa; Bulimia nervosa; Eating disorders; Erosive tooth wear; Gingival recession; Gingivitis

PMID:
30876949
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdent.2019.03.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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