Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Anat. 2019 Jul;32(5):697-698. doi: 10.1002/ca.23375. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Reporting sex or gender in anatomical research: Which is appropriate?

Author information

1
International Evidence-Based Anatomy Working Group, Krakow, Poland.
2
Division of Clinical Anatomy, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.
3
Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
4
The Heart Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Abstract

Sex- and gender-based differences need to be considered in evidence-based medical research as there are anatomical and physiological differences between males and females. Females are underrepresented in studies, with results from males often generalized to both sexes. The Sex and Gender Equity in Research (SAGER) guidelines were published in 2016 to address sex- and gender-bias in research. Correct understanding and appropriate use of the terms "sex" and "gender" are essential. These terms are discussed in an anatomical context and recommendations are made as to how the SAGER guidelines can guide the reporting of anatomical studies to minimize the risk of reporting bias. Clin. Anat. 32:697-698, 2019.

KEYWORDS:

female; gender; male; publication bias; sex

PMID:
30875136
DOI:
10.1002/ca.23375

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center