Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Dig Dis Sci. 2019 Mar 14. doi: 10.1007/s10620-019-05585-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Utilization of Census Tract-Based Neighborhood Poverty Rates to Predict Non-adherence to Screening Colonoscopy.

Author information

1
Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, 1725 West Harrison Street, Suite 206, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA.
2
Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, 1725 West Harrison Street, Suite 206, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA. Joshua_Melson@rush.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Efforts to improve colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates include recognizing predictors of colonoscopy non-adherence and identifying these high-risk patient populations. Past studies have focused on individual-level factors but few have evaluated the influence of neighborhood-level predictors. We sought to assess the effect of census tract-based neighborhood poverty rates on scheduled screening colonoscopy non-adherence.

METHODS:

In this prospective observational cohort study, data from electronic medical records and appointment tracking software were collected in 599 patients scheduled to undergo outpatient CRC screening colonoscopy at two academic endoscopy centers between January 2011 and December 2012. Non-adherence was defined as failure to attend a colonoscopy appointment within 1 year of the date it was electronically scheduled. Neighborhood poverty rate was determined by matching patients' self-reported home address with their corresponding US census tract. Individual factors including medical comorbidities and prior appointment adherence behavior were also collected.

RESULTS:

Overall, 17% (65/383) of patients were non-adherent to scheduled colonoscopy at 1-year follow-up. Neighborhood poverty rate was a significant predictor of non-adherence to scheduled screening colonoscopy in multivariate modeling (OR 1.53 per 10% increase in neighborhood poverty rate, 95% CI 1.21-1.95, p < 0.001). By incorporating the neighborhood poverty rate, screening colonoscopy non-adherence was 31% at the highest quartile compared to 14% at the lowest quartile of neighborhood poverty rates (p = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS:

Census tract-based neighborhood poverty rates can be used to predict non-adherence to scheduled screening colonoscopy. Targeted efforts to increase CRC screening efficiency and completion among patients living in high-poverty geographic regions could reduce screening disparities and improve utilization of endoscopy unit resources.

KEYWORDS:

Colonoscopy; Geocoding; Neighborhood socioeconomic status; Organizational efficiency

PMID:
30874988
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-019-05585-8

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center