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Nat Commun. 2019 Mar 15;10(1):1222. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-09166-1.

Pervasive function and evidence for selection across standing genetic variation in S. cerevisiae.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical & Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.
2
Department of Chemical & Systems Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. jarosz@stanford.edu.
3
Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. jarosz@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Quantitative genetics aims to map genotype to phenotype, often with the goal of understanding how organisms evolved. However, it remains unclear whether the genetic variants identified are exemplary of evolution. Here we analyzed progeny of two wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates to identify 195 loci underlying complex metabolic traits, resolving 107 to single polymorphisms with diverse molecular mechanisms. More than 20% of causal variants exhibited patterns of emergence inconsistent with neutrality. Moreover, contrary to drift-centric expectation, variation in diverse wild yeast isolates broadly exhibited this property: over 30% of shared natural variants exhibited phylogenetic signatures suggesting that they are not neutral. This pattern is likely attributable to both homoplasy and balancing selection on ancestral polymorphism. Variants that emerged repeatedly were more likely to have done so in isolates from the same ecological niche. Our results underscore the power of super-resolution mapping of ecologically relevant traits in understanding adaptation and evolution.

PMID:
30874558
PMCID:
PMC6420628
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-09166-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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