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Int J Cancer. 2019 Dec 15;145(12):3244-3256. doi: 10.1002/ijc.32276. Epub 2019 Apr 4.

The associations of anthropometric, behavioural and sociodemographic factors with circulating concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 in a pooled analysis of 16,024 men from 22 studies.

Author information

1
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
2
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
3
Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
4
Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
7
Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
9
Department Urology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
10
Public Health Sciences Division, Program in Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.
11
PathWest Laboratory Medicine, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia.
12
Medical School, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
13
Sorbonne Paris Cité Epidemiology and Statistics Research Center (CRESS), Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Inserm U1153/Inra U1125/Cnam/Paris 13 University, Paris, France.
14
Department of Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
15
Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
16
Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
17
WA Centre for Health & Ageing, Centre for Medical Research, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Perth, WA, Australia.
18
Department of Geriatric Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia.
19
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
20
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
21
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
22
Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
23
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA.
24
Department of Biobank Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
25
Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
26
Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
27
IGFs & Metabolic Endocrinology Group, Translational Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
28
Genetic Epidemiology Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
29
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
30
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan.
31
National Institute for Health Research Bristol Biomedical Research Unit in Nutrition, Bristol, United Kingdom.
32
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.
33
University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI.
34
Medical Research Council/University of Bristol Integrative Epidemiology Unit, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.
35
Department of Neurology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN.
36
Japanese Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Kyoto, Japan.
37
Chemical Pathology Directorate, SA Pathology, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
38
Cancer Prevention Program, Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.
39
Department of Health Sciences, University of York and the Hull York Medical School, York, UK.
40
Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
41
Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan.
42
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano, Milan, Italy.
43
Department of Medicine and Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
44
Segal Cancer Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada.
45
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
46
Hokkaido University Faculty of Medicine, Hokkaido, Japan.
47
Department of Medical Biosciences and Pathology, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
48
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
49
Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
50
Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia.
51
Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have been implicated in the aetiology of several cancers. To better understand whether anthropometric, behavioural and sociodemographic factors may play a role in cancer risk via IGF signalling, we examined the cross-sectional associations of these exposures with circulating concentrations of IGFs (IGF-I and IGF-II) and IGFBPs (IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3). The Endogenous Hormones, Nutritional Biomarkers and Prostate Cancer Collaborative Group dataset includes individual participant data from 16,024 male controls (i.e. without prostate cancer) aged 22-89 years from 22 prospective studies. Geometric means of protein concentrations were estimated using analysis of variance, adjusted for relevant covariates. Older age was associated with higher concentrations of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 and lower concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3. Higher body mass index was associated with lower concentrations of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2. Taller height was associated with higher concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and lower concentrations of IGFBP-1. Smokers had higher concentrations of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 and lower concentrations of IGFBP-3 than nonsmokers. Higher alcohol consumption was associated with higher concentrations of IGF-II and lower concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-2. African Americans had lower concentrations of IGF-II, IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 and Hispanics had lower IGF-I, IGF-II and IGFBP-3 than non-Hispanic whites. These findings indicate that a range of anthropometric, behavioural and sociodemographic factors are associated with circulating concentrations of IGFs and IGFBPs in men, which will lead to a greater understanding of the mechanisms through which these factors influence cancer risk.

KEYWORDS:

IGFBPs; IGFs; correlates; pooled analysis

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