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Nat Rev Cancer. 2019 May;19(5):283-288. doi: 10.1038/s41568-019-0128-6.

Extrachromosomal oncogene amplification in tumour pathogenesis and evolution.

Author information

1
The Jackson Laboratory for Genomic Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA. roel.verhaak@jax.org.
2
Computer Science and Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. vbafna@eng.ucsd.edu.
3
Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. pmischel@ucsd.edu.
4
UCSD School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA. pmischel@ucsd.edu.

Abstract

Recent reports have demonstrated that oncogene amplification on extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA) is a frequent event in cancer, providing new momentum to explore a phenomenon first discovered several decades ago. The direct consequence of ecDNA gains in these cases is an increase in DNA copy number of the oncogenes residing on the extrachromosomal element. A secondary effect, perhaps even more important, is that the unequal segregation of ecDNA from a parental tumour cell to offspring cells rapidly increases tumour heterogeneity, thus providing the tumour with an additional array of responses to microenvironment-induced and therapy-induced stress factors and perhaps providing an evolutionary advantage. This Perspectives article discusses the current knowledge and potential implications of oncogene amplification on ecDNA in cancer.

PMID:
30872802
DOI:
10.1038/s41568-019-0128-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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