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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Jul;81(1):152-156. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2019.02.064. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Prevalence estimates for chronic urticaria in the United States: A sex- and age-adjusted population analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New Hyde Park, New York.
2
Department of Dermatology, Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, New Hyde Park, New York. Electronic address: amgarg@northwell.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Disease burden in chronic urticaria (CU) is poorly understood.

OBJECTIVE:

To estimate standardized overall and sex-, age-, and race-specific prevalence estimates for CU among adults in the United States.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional analysis with electronic health records data for a demographically heterogeneous population-based sample of >55 million patients across all 4 census regions.

RESULTS:

The overall CU prevalence was 0.23%, or 230 CU cases/100,000 adults. The adjusted prevalence in women was 310 (95% confidence interval [CI] 307-312) cases/100,000 adults, more than twice that of men (146 [95% CI 143-148] cases/100,000 adults, P < .001). CU prevalence was highest among patients aged 40-49 years (256 [95% CI 252-261] cases/100,000 adults) and 50-59 years (246 [95% CI 242-251] cases/100,000 adults) compared with all other age groups (P < .0001). Adjusted prevalences for black (292 [95% CI 285-298] cases/100,000 adults) and other (331 [95% CI 323-338] cases/100,000 adults) patients were higher than that for white patients (262 [95% CI 260-264] cases/100,000 adults; P < .001).

LIMITATIONS:

Use of administrative data has the potential to underestimate burden.

CONCLUSION:

There are >500,000 people estimated to have CU in the United States, most of whom are women or adults ≥40 years of age.

KEYWORDS:

Explorys; burden of disease; chronic urticaria; population-based; prevalence; urticaria

PMID:
30872154
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2019.02.064

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