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Environ Health. 2019 Mar 12;18(1):20. doi: 10.1186/s12940-019-0458-6.

Urinary concentrations of phthalate biomarkers and weight change among postmenopausal women: a prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 411 Arnold House, 715 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA.
2
Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
3
Cancer Prevention Program, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
6
Program in Public Health, Department of Family Population and Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, USA.
7
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 411 Arnold House, 715 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA. kwreeves@umass.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Some phthalates are endocrine disrupting chemicals used as plasticizers in consumer products, and have been associated with obesity in cross-sectional studies, yet prospective evaluations of weight change are lacking. Our objective was to evaluate associations between phthalate biomarker concentrations and weight and weight change among postmenopausal women.

METHODS:

We performed cross-sectional (N = 997) and longitudinal analyses (N = 660) among postmenopausal Women's Health Initiative participants. We measured 13 phthalate metabolites and creatinine in spot urine samples provided at baseline. Participants' weight and height measured at in-person clinic visits at baseline, year 3, and year 6 were used to calculate body mass index (BMI). We fit multivariable multinomial logistic regression models to explore cross-sectional associations between each phthalate biomarker and baseline BMI category. We evaluated longitudinal associations between each biomarker and weight change using mixed effects linear regression models.

RESULTS:

In cross-sectional analyses, urinary concentrations of some biomarkers were positively associated with obesity prevalence (e.g. sum of di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites [ΣDEHP] 4th vs 1st quartile OR = 3.29, 95% CI 1.80-6.03 [p trend< 0.001] vs normal). In longitudinal analyses, positive trends with weight gain between baseline and year 3 were observed for mono-(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate, monoethyl phthalate (MEP), mono-hydroxybutyl phthalate, and mono-hydroxyisobutyl phthalate (e.g. + 2.32 kg [95% CI 0.93-3.72] for 4th vs 1st quartile of MEP; p trend < 0.001). No statistically significant associations were observed between biomarkers and weight gain over 6 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Certain phthalates may contribute to short-term weight gain among postmenopausal women.

KEYWORDS:

Endocrine disruption; Obesity; Phthalates; Postmenopause; Weight change; Women

PMID:
30866962
DOI:
10.1186/s12940-019-0458-6
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