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Sci Rep. 2019 Mar 12;9(1):4168. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-39983-9.

Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, temperature regulation and the role of heat shock proteins in non-asthmatic recreational marathon and half-marathon runners.

Author information

1
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Cardiac and Thoracic Diagnosis and Regeneration, Vienna, Austria.
2
Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of General Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, Vienna, Austria.
3
Sportordination, Alserstraße 28, Vienna, Austria.
4
Department of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
5
Christian Doppler Laboratory for Cardiac and Thoracic Diagnosis and Regeneration, Vienna, Austria. bernhard.moser@meduniwien.ac.at.
6
Department of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria. bernhard.moser@meduniwien.ac.at.

Abstract

Exercise is the most common trigger of bronchospasm. Heat shock protein (HSP) expression was linked to asthmatic patients. The prevalence and pathophysiology of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in non-professional non-asthmatic runners is unknown. We sought to investigate the frequency of EIB and cytokine changes in non-professional non-asthmatic marathon and half marathoners with and without EIB. Testing was performed before the marathon (baseline), immediately post-marathon at the finish area (peak), and 2-7 days after the marathon (recovery): immunosorbent assays for measurement of HSP70, blood count analysis, spirometry and temperature measurements. We experienced a decline in FEV1 of ≥10% in 35.29% of marathon and 22.22% of half marathon runners. Runners with EIB had significantly higher HSP70 serum concentrations at baseline than those without EIB (987.4 ± 1486.7 vs. 655.6 ± 1073.9; p = 0.014). Marathoners with EIB had significantly increased WBC before participating in the competition (7.4 ± 1.7 vs. 6.0 ± 1.5; p = 0.021). After recovery we found increased HSP70 serum concentrations in marathoners with EIB compared to those without (2539.2 ± 1692.5 vs. 1237.2 ± 835.2; p = 0.032), WBC (7.6 ± 1.8 vs. 6.4 ± 1.6; p = 0.048) and PLT (273.0 ± 43.0 vs 237.2 ± 48.3; p = 0.040). At all measured skin sites skin temperatures in runners were significantly lower immediately after participating in the competition when compared to temperature before the race (skin temperature baseline vs. peak: abdominal: 33.1 ± 0.2 vs. 30.0 ± 0.4; p < 0.001; upper arm: 31.6 ± 0.2 vs. 29.4 ± 0.3; p < 0.001; upper leg: 30.7 ± 0.3 vs. 29.4 ± 0.2; p = 0.014; lower leg: 30.6 ± 1.0 vs. 30.2 ± 1.5; p = 0.007). We found a higher than expected number of non-professional athletes with EIB. HSP70 serum concentrations and elevated WBC could indicate a predisposition to EIB.

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