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Sci Rep. 2019 Mar 12;9(1):4262. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-40200-w.

The neurophysiological correlates of religious chanting.

Author information

1
Buddhism and Science Research Lab, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.
2
Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
3
Buddhism and Science Research Lab, Centre of Buddhist Studies, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong. hinhung@hku.hk.

Abstract

Despite extensive research on various types of meditation, research on the neural correlates of religious chanting is in a nascent stage. Using multi-modal electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods, we illustrate that during religious chanting, the posterior cingulate cortex shows the largest decrease in eigenvector centrality, potentially due to regional endogenous generation of delta oscillations. Our data show that these functional effects are not due to peripheral cardiac or respiratory activity, nor due to implicit language processing. Finally, we suggest that the neurophysiological correlates of religious chanting are likely different from those of meditation and prayer, and would possibly induce distinctive psychotherapeutic effects.

PMID:
30862790
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-019-40200-w
Free PMC Article

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