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Rev Iberoam Micol. 2019 Apr - Jun;36(2):79-82. doi: 10.1016/j.riam.2019.01.002. Epub 2019 Mar 9.

Molecular detection of Histoplasma capsulatum indoors: A public health approach.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Zoonoses and Vector-borne Diseases, Zoonoses Surveillance Division - Health Surveillance Coordination, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
2
Chiroptera Section, Zoonoses Surveillance Division - Health Surveillance Coordination, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
3
Laboratory of Pathogenic Dimorphic Fungi, University of São Paulo - Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Department of Microbiology, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.
4
Laboratory of Zoonoses and Vector-borne Diseases, Zoonoses Surveillance Division - Health Surveillance Coordination, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: adrianamenezes@prefeitura.sp.gov.br.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Histoplasmosis, caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum, represents an important public health problem, especially in urban environments where bats and humans cohabit indoors.

AIMS:

To detect the presence of H. capsulatum indoors, using samples of bat droppings collected in roost sites inside houses.

METHODS:

A Real-Time TaqMan PCR assay targeting the ITS1 region of the ribosomal DNA of H. capsulatum was carried out.

RESULTS:

Fifty-nine sampling points in the municipality of São Paulo were inspected, all of them located at inhabited places. H. capsulatum was isolated from nine samples.

CONCLUSIONS:

The rapid identification and monitoring of sites where the fungus is present may contribute to make a more reliable database of H. capsulatum distribution.

KEYWORDS:

Bats; Histoplasmosis; Indoors; Interiores; Murciélagos; Surveillance; Vigilancia; qPCR

PMID:
30862390
DOI:
10.1016/j.riam.2019.01.002

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