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PLoS One. 2019 Mar 12;14(3):e0213474. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0213474. eCollection 2019.

High fat diet induces sex-specific differential gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Respiratory Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America.
2
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America.
3
Department of Neurosciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America.
4
Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, California, United States of America.

Abstract

Currently about 2 billion adults globally are estimated to be overweight and ~13% of them are obese. High fat diet (HFD) is one of the major contributing factor to obesity, heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Recent findings on the role of HFD in inducing abnormalities in neurocognition and susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease are highly intriguing. Since fundamental molecular pathways are often conserved across species, studies involving Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism can provide insight into the molecular mechanisms involving human disease. In order to study some of such mechanisms in the central nervous system as well in the rest of the body, we investigated the effect of HFD on the transcriptome in the heads and bodies of male and female flies kept on either HFD or regular diet (RD). Using comprehensive genomic analyses which include high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, pathway enrichment and gene network analyses, we found that HFD induces a number of responses that are sexually dimorphic in nature. There was a robust transcriptional response consisting of a downregulation of stress-related genes in the heads and glycoside hydrolase activity genes in the bodies of males. In the females, the HFD led to an increased transcriptional change in lipid metabolism. A strong correlation also existed between the takeout gene and hyperphagic behavior in both males and females. We conclude that a) HFD induces a differential transcriptional response between males and females, in heads and bodies and b) the non-dimorphic transcriptional response that we identified was associated with hyperphagia. Therefore, our data on the transcriptional responses in flies to HFD provides potentially relevant information to human conditions including obesity.

PMID:
30861021
PMCID:
PMC6413938
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0213474
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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