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Acta Ophthalmol. 2019 May;97(3):e460-e470. doi: 10.1111/aos.14080. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Amphiregulin and ocular axial length.

Author information

1
Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Key Laboratory of Intraocular Tumor Diagnosis and Treatment, Beijing Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences Key Lab, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Oncology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
3
Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology and Beijing Ophthalmology and Visual Science Key Lab, Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
4
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
5
Eye Institute of Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan, Shandong, China.
6
Department of Ophthalmology, Medical Faculty Mannheim of the Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To assess the potential role of amphiregulin as messenger molecule in ocular axial elongation.

METHODS:

The experimental study included guinea pigs (total n = 78) (age: 3-4 weeks) which underwent bilateral lens-induced myopization and received 15 days later three intraocular injections in weekly intervals of amphiregulin antibody (doses:5 μg, 10 μg, 20 μg) into their right eyes, and three phosphate-buffered saline injections into their left eyes; and guinea pigs without lens-induced myopization and which received three unilateral intraocular injections of amphiregulin antibody (dose: 20 μg) or amphiregulin (doses: 1 ng; 10 ng; 20 ng) into their right eyes, and three phosphate-buffered saline injections into their left eyes. Seven days later, the animals were sacrificed. Intravitally, we performed biometry, and histology and immunohistochemistry post-mortem.

RESULTS:

In animals with bilateral lens-induced myopization, the right eyes receiving amphiregulin antibody showed reduced axial elongation in a dose-dependent manner (dose: 5 μg: side difference: 0.14 ± 0.05 mm;10 μg: 0.22 ± 0.06 mm; 20 μg: 0.32 ± 0.06 mm; p < 0.001), thicker sclera (all p < 0.05) and higher cell density in the retinal nuclear layers and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) (all p < 0.05). In animals without lens-induced myopia, the right eyes with amphiregulin antibody application (20 μg) showed reduced axial elongation (p = 0.04), and the right eyes with amphiregulin injections experienced increased (p = 0.02) axial elongation in a dose-dependent manner (1 ng: 0.04 ± 0.06 mm; 10 ng: 0.10 ± 0.05 mm; 20 ng: 0.11 ± 0.06 mm). Eyes with lens-induced axial elongation as compared to eyes without lens-induced axial elongation revealed an increased visualization of amphiregulin upon immunohistochemistry and higher expression of mRNA of endogenous amphiregulin and epidermal growth factor receptor, in particular in the outer part of the retinal inner nuclear layer and in the RPE.

CONCLUSION:

Amphiregulin may be associated with axial elongation in young guinea pigs.

KEYWORDS:

Bruch´s membrane; amphiregulin; blindness; epidermal growth factor; myopia; myopic retinopathy; refractive error; retinal pigment epithelium

PMID:
30860674
DOI:
10.1111/aos.14080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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