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J Oral Pathol Med. 2019 Mar 12. doi: 10.1111/jop.12847. [Epub ahead of print]

Long-term evaluation of pemphigus vulgaris: A retrospective consideration of 98 patients treated in an oral medicine unit in north-west Italy.

Author information

1
Department of Surgical Sciences, CIR-Dental School, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
2
Dimeas, Politecnico of Turin, Turin, Italy.
3
Unit of Epidemiology, Regional Health Service ASL TO3, Grugliasco, Italy.
4
Center of Research of Immunopathology and Rare Diseases-Coordinating Center of the Network for Rare Diseases of Piedmont and Aosta Valley, Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
5
Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite the frequency of oral involvement, there are unexpectedly few studies of either on the oral manifestations of pemphigus or their long-term management, and diagnostic delay in Dentistry is frequent.

METHODS:

We have examined outcome of patients presenting with predominantly oral pemphigus vulgaris (PV). Ninety-eight subjects were followed up for 85.12 months and treated with systemic steroids: 48 of them received adjunctive therapy with azathioprine, 16 with rituximab, 13 with mycophenolate mofetil, three with immunoglobulin and one with dapsone.

RESULTS:

Clinical remission was achieved in 80 patients (84.21%); 39 of them were off therapy and 41 on therapy. Fifteen patients were not in remission, having been under systemic therapy for 72.16 months. Sixty-nine patients developed detectable adverse effects. Two fatal outcomes were recorded. Each additional year of steroid therapy ensured 47% chance of developing 1 or 2 side effects, and 64% chance of developing more than 3 (ORs 1.47, CI 1.162-1.903; ORs 1.64, CI 1.107-2.130, respectively).

CONCLUSION:

In one of the largest available cohort with the longest follow-up ever reported, we observed that the management remains need-based and patient-specific, still relying on systemic corticosteroids.

KEYWORDS:

oral manifestation; pemphigus vulgaris; treatment and adverse effects

PMID:
30860627
DOI:
10.1111/jop.12847

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