Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Lancet. 2019 Mar 9;393(10175):1034-1044. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31808-7.

Heart failure drug treatment.

Author information

1
Centre d'Investigations Cliniques Plurithématique 1433, Université de Lorraine, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (Inserm), Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy, Inserm U1116, and French Clinical Research Network, Investigation Network Initiative-Cardiovascular and Renal Clinical Trialists (FCRIN INI-CRCT), Nancy, France. Electronic address: p.rossignol@chru-nancy.fr.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, NC, USA.
3
Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, MA, USA.
4
Centre d'Investigations Cliniques Plurithématique 1433, Université de Lorraine, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (Inserm), Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire (CHRU) de Nancy, Inserm U1116, and French Clinical Research Network, Investigation Network Initiative-Cardiovascular and Renal Clinical Trialists (FCRIN INI-CRCT), Nancy, France.

Abstract

Heart failure is the most common cardiovascular reason for hospital admission for people older than 60 years of age. Few areas in medicine have progressed as remarkably as heart failure treatment over the past three decades. However, progress has been consistent only for chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. In acutely decompensated heart failure and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, none of the treatments tested to date have been definitively proven to improve survival. Delaying or preventing heart failure has become increasingly important in patients who are prone to heart failure. The prevention of worsening chronic heart failure and hospitalisations for acute decompensation is also of great importance. The objective of this Series paper is to provide a concise and practical summary of the available drug treatments for heart failure. We support the implementation of the international guidelines. We offer views on the basis of our personal experience in research areas that have insufficient evidence. The best possible evidence-based drug treatment (including inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and β blockers) is useful only when optimally implemented. However, implementation might be challenging. We believe that disease management programmes can be helpful in providing a multidisciplinary, holistic approach to the delivery of optimal medical care.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center