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Pediatrics. 2019 Apr;143(4). pii: e20183249. doi: 10.1542/peds.2018-3249. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Parental Smoking and E-cigarette Use in Homes and Cars.

Author information

1
Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
Tobacco Research and Treatment Center and.
3
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York.
4
Mongan Institute Health Policy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois; and.
7
Julius B. Richmond Center of Excellence, American Academy of Pediatrics, Itasca, Illinois.
8
Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, Massachusetts; jwinickoff@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine how smoke-free and vape-free home and car policies differ for parents who are dual users of cigarettes and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), who only smoke cigarettes, or who only use e-cigarettes. To identify factors associated with not having smoke-free or vape-free policies and how often smoke-free advice is offered at pediatric offices.

METHODS:

Secondary analysis of 2017 parental interview data collected after their children's visit in 5 control practices participating in the Clinical Effort Against Secondhand Smoke Exposure trial.

RESULTS:

Most dual users had smoke-free home policies, yet fewer had a vape-free home policies (63.8% vs 26.3%; P < .01). Dual users were less likely than cigarette users to have smoke-free car (P < .01), vape-free home (P < .001), or vape-free car (P < .001) policies. Inside cars, dual users were more likely than cigarette users to report smoking (P < .001), e-cigarette use (P < .001), and e-cigarette use with children present (P < .001). Parental characteristics associated with not having smoke-free or vape-free home and car policies include smoking ≥10 cigarettes per day, using e-cigarettes, and having a youngest child >10 years old. Smoke-free home and car advice was infrequently delivered.

CONCLUSIONS:

Parents may perceive e-cigarette aerosol as safe for children. Dual users more often had smoke-free policies than vape-free policies for the home. Dual users were less likely than cigarette-only smokers to report various child-protective measures inside homes and cars. These findings reveal important opportunities for intervention with parents about smoking and vaping in homes and cars.

PMID:
30858346
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2018-3249

Conflict of interest statement

POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: Not related to this article, Dr Rigotti receives royalties from UpToDate, Inc, is an unpaid consultant to Pfizer regarding smoking cessation, and is a paid consultant to Achieve Life Sciences regarding an investigational smoking-cessation aid; the other authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

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