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Schizophr Res. 2019 Mar 8. pii: S0920-9964(19)30077-5. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2019.02.017. [Epub ahead of print]

A developmental redox dysregulation leads to spatio-temporal deficit of parvalbumin neuron circuitry in a schizophrenia mouse model.

Author information

1
Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Lausanne University Hospital-CHUV, Prilly-Lausanne, Switzerland.
2
Department of Fundamental Neurosciences, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
3
Center for Psychiatric Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Lausanne University Hospital-CHUV, Prilly-Lausanne, Switzerland. Electronic address: Kim.Do@chuv.ch.

Abstract

The fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) interneurons play a critical role in neural circuit activity and dysfunction of these cells has been implicated in the cognitive deficits typically observed in schizophrenia patients. Due to the high metabolic demands of PV neurons, they are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. Given the extant literature exploring the pathological effects of oxidative stress on PV cells in cortical regions linked to schizophrenia, we decided to investigate whether PV neurons in other select brain regions, including sub-cortical structures, may be differentially affected by redox dysregulation induced oxidative stress during neurodevelopment in mice with a genetically compromised glutathione synthesis (Gclm KO mice). Our analyses revealed a spatio-temporal sequence of PV cell deficit in Gclm KO mice, beginning with the thalamic reticular nucleus at postnatal day (P) 20 followed by a PV neuronal deficit in the amygdala at P40, then in the lateral globus pallidus and the ventral hippocampus Cornu Ammonis 3 region at P90 and finally the anterior cingulate cortex at P180. We suggest that PV neurons in different brain regions are developmentally susceptible to oxidative stress and that anomalies in the neurodevelopmental calendar of metabolic regulation can interfere with neural circuit maturation and functional connectivity contributing to the emergence of developmental psychopathology.

KEYWORDS:

Functional connectivity; Neurodevelopment; Oxidative stress; Parvalbumin; Perineuronal nets; Schizophrenia

PMID:
30857872
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2019.02.017
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