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Compr Psychiatry. 2019 Feb 22;91:6-12. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2019.02.006. [Epub ahead of print]

Sleep disturbances in schizophrenia spectrum and bipolar disorders - a transdiagnostic perspective.

Author information

1
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: j.f.anderssen@medisin.uio.no.
2
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Early Intervention in Psychosis Advisory Unit for South East Norway, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital Trust, Norway.
3
NORMENT, KG Jebsen Center for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital & Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
4
Early Intervention in Psychosis Advisory Unit for South East Norway, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital Trust, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sleep disturbances are prevalent in severe mental disorders but their type and frequency across diagnostic categories has not been investigated in large scale studies.

METHODS:

Participants with Schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SCZ, (N = 617)), Bipolar disorders (BD, (N = 440)), and Healthy Controls (HC, (N = 173)) were included in the study. Sleep disturbances (insomnia, hypersomnia and delayed sleep phase) were identified based on items from the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms - Clinician rated scale. Clinical symptoms were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome scale and level of functioning with the Global assessment of Functioning scale.

RESULTS:

The rate of any sleep disturbance was 78% in SZ, 69% in BD and 39% in HC. Insomnia was the most frequently reported sleep disturbance across all groups. Both diagnostic groups reported significantly more of any sleep disturbances than HC (P < 0.001). Having a sleep disturbance was associated with more severe negative and depressive symptoms and with lower functioning across diagnostic groups (P < 0.001, η2 = 0.0071). Hypersomnia was the only sleep disturbance associated with previous treatment history.

CONCLUSION:

Sleep disturbances, including insomnia, hypersomnia and delayed sleep phase, are frequent in SCZ and BD, and associated with more severe clinical symptomatology across diagnostic groups. This suggests that sleep disturbance is a clinically relevant transdiagnostic phenomenon.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorders; Healthy controls; Schizophrenia; Sleep disturbances

PMID:
30856497
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2019.02.006
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