Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Osteoporos. 2019 Mar 9;14(1):34. doi: 10.1007/s11657-019-0590-5.

The association between hepatitis and osteoporosis: a nested case-control study using a national sample cohort.

Min C1,2,3, Bang WJ4, Kim M5, Oh DJ6, Choi HG7,8.

Author information

1
Hallym Data Science Laboratory, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea.
3
Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
4
Department of Urology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea.
5
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
7
Hallym Data Science Laboratory, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea. pupen@naver.com.
8
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, South Korea. pupen@naver.com.

Abstract

The prevalence of hepatitis B was higher in osteoporosis patients than the control group, especially in females. However, the prevalence of hepatitis C was not different. The matching for various factors improved to have same conditions between osteoporosis patients and the control group.

PURPOSE:

Although chronic liver disease, including hepatitis B and hepatitis C, has been associated with osteoporosis in previous studies, the evidence was insufficient, and some findings were inconsistent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between hepatitis B or hepatitis C and osteoporosis.

METHODS:

We used the Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort with ≥ 50-year-old participants from 2002 to 2013. Age was determined at osteoporosis diagnosis. We extracted 68,492 osteoporosis patients (ICD-10 codes E7001-E7004, HC341-HC345) with a 68,492-member control group at a ratio of 1:1 by age, sex, income, region of residence, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. We analyzed previous histories of hepatitis B (ICD-10 codes B18.0-B18.1) and hepatitis C (ICD-10 code B18.2) in the osteoporosis patients and control groups. The logistic regression with the crude and adjusted model was analyzed. Additionally, subgroup analyses divided by age and sex were performed.

RESULTS:

The adjusted odds ratios for hepatitis B and hepatitis C were 1.19 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.11-1.28, P < 0.001) and 1.04 (95% CI = 0.90-1.19, P > 0.05), respectively, in osteoporosis patients. Subgroup analyses showed that the risk of hepatitis B was higher in osteoporosis patients in female groups but not in male groups.

CONCLUSION:

Hepatitis B virus infection might be a risk factor for osteoporosis.

KEYWORDS:

Bone loss; Hepatitis B; Hepatitis C; Infection; Liver disease; Osteoporosis

PMID:
30852676
DOI:
10.1007/s11657-019-0590-5

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center