Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int Immunopharmacol. 2019 May;70:387-395. doi: 10.1016/j.intimp.2019.02.031. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Different doses of vitamin C supplementation enhances the Th1 immune response to early Plasmodium yoelii 17XL infection in BALB/c mice.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110013, China; Department of Laboratory Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004, China.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004, China.
3
Clinical Lab, Cancer Hospital of China Medical University, Liaoning Cancer Hospital & Institute, Shenyang 110042, China.
4
Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110013, China.
5
Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Taizhou University Medical School, No 1139 Shifu Road, Jiaojiang District, Taizhou 317700, China. Electronic address: misschenguang75@163.com.
6
Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, China Medical University, Shenyang 110013, China. Electronic address: ymcao@163.com.

Abstract

Vitamin C (ascorbate) is maintained at high levels in most immune cells and can affect many aspects of the immune response. Here, we evaluated the effect of vitamin C supplementation on the immune response to Plasmodium yoelii 17XL (P. yoelii 17XL) infection in BALB/c mice. Two orally administered doses (25 mg/kg/day and 250 mg/kg/day) of vitamin C significantly reduced levels of parasitemia during the early stages of P. yoelii 17XL infection. The numbers of activated Th1 cells and macrophages in the groups receiving vitamin C supplementation were both higher than those in the untreated group. Meanwhile, vitamin C administration reduced the levels of tumor necrosis factor α secreted by splenocytes. Vitamin C also regulated the protective anti-malarial immune response by increasing the number of plasmacytoid dendritic cells, as well as the expression of dendritic cell maturation markers, such as major histocompatibility complex class II and cluster of differentiation 86. In conclusion, the doses of vitamin C (25 mg/kg/day, 250 mg/kg/day) during the early stages of malaria infection may better enhance host protective immunity, but have no dose dependence.

KEYWORDS:

Effects on immune response; Plasmodium yoelii 17XL; Vitamin C

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center