Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Plant Sci. 2019 Jun;24(6):496-506. doi: 10.1016/j.tplants.2019.02.006. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Perspective on Alternative Splicing and Proteome Complexity in Plants.

Author information

1
School of Human and Life Sciences, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, CT1 1QU, UK; These authors contributed equally to this work.
2
Department of Biology and Program in Cell and Molecular Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1878, USA.
3
RNA Biology and Molecular Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Bielefeld University, Bielefeld, Germany.
4
School of Human and Life Sciences, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, CT1 1QU, UK. Electronic address: naeem.syed@canterbury.ac.uk.

Abstract

Alternative splicing (AS) generates multiple transcripts from the same gene, however, AS contribution to proteome complexity remains elusive in plants. AS is prevalent under stress conditions in plants, but it is counterintuitive why plants would invest in protein synthesis under declining energy supply. We propose that plants employ AS not only to potentially increasing proteomic complexity, but also to buffer against the stress-responsive transcriptome to reduce the metabolic cost of translating all AS transcripts. To maximise efficiency under stress, plants may make fewer proteins with disordered domains via AS to diversify substrate specificity and maintain sufficient regulatory capacity. Furthermore, we suggest that chromatin state-dependent AS engenders short/long-term stress memory to mediate reproducible transcriptional response in the future.

KEYWORDS:

IDPs; alternative splicing; protein diversity; stress memory; translational coincidence

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center