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J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2019 Jun;190:11-18. doi: 10.1016/j.jsbmb.2019.03.001. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Resveratrol and other dietary polyphenols are inhibitors of estrogen metabolism in human breast cancer cells.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Division of Clinical Pharmacy and Diagnostics, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria.
2
Department of Pathophysiology and Allergy Research, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.
3
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Division of Clinical Pharmacy and Diagnostics, University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna, Austria; Vienna Metabolomics Center (VIME), University of Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: walter.jaeger@univie.ac.at.

Abstract

Polyphenols in foods and dietary supplements are commonly used for the prevention and treatment of a variety of malignancies, including breast cancer. However, daily intake by patients with breast cancer is controversial, as these compounds may stimulate cancer growth. Estrogens serve key roles in breast cancer cell proliferation; therefore, understanding the interaction between endogenous steroid hormones and natural dietary polyphenols is essential. Currently, comprehensive knowledge regarding these effects remains limited. The current review summarizes the dose-dependent in vitro and in vivo interactions of resveratrol and other dietary polyphenols with estrogen precursors, active estrogens, catechol estrogens and their respective glucuronidated, sulfated, glutathionated or O-methylated metabolites in estrogen receptor alpha negative (ERα-) and positive (ERα+) breast cancer. Which estrogen-metabolizing enzymes are affected by polyphenols is also reviewed in detail. Furthermore, the impacts of dose and therapy duration on disease development and progression in patients with breast cancer are discussed. The present article is part of a Special Issue titled 'CSR 2018'.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; Estrogens; Metabolism; Polyphenols; Resveratrol; Steroids

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