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Free Radic Biol Med. 2019 Oct;142:146-154. doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2019.02.032. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Feeding practice influences gut microbiome composition in very low birth weight preterm infants and the association with oxidative stress: A prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Food and Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, 208A Human Ecology Building, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: ccai1@ualberta.ca.
2
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, 208A Human Ecology Building, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: zh16@ualberta.ca.
3
Department of Food and Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, 208A Human Ecology Building, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: mcrmorales@gmail.com.
4
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, 208A Human Ecology Building, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: wangyanan28@hotmail.com.
5
Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, 208A Human Ecology Building, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada.
6
Department of Food and Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, 208A Human Ecology Building, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2, Canada. Electronic address: James.Friel@umanitoba.ca.

Abstract

Knowledge about the development of the preterm infant gut microbiota is emerging and is critical to their health. Very-low-birth-weight (VLBW; birth weight, <1500 g) infants usually have special dietary needs while showing increased oxidative stress related to intensive care. This prospective cohort study assessed the effect of feeding practice on gut microbiome development and oxidative stress in preterm infants. Fecal samples were collected from each infant in the early (1-2 weeks of enteral feeding) and late (2-4 weeks of enteral feeding) feeding stages. We performed high-throughput sequencing of V3-V4 regions of the 16S rRNA gene to analyze the fecal microbiome composition of 20 VLBW preterm infants and to determine the association of gut bacterial composition with feeding practice using an oxidative stress marker (urinary F2-isoprostane). Our results showed that feeding practices in the late stage significantly influenced the gut microbiome composition and oxidative stress in preterm infants. Preterm infants fed human milk + human milk fortifier and only formula diets showed a significant increase in F2-isoprostane levels (P < 0.05) compared with those fed human milk + formula diet. The gut microbiome of the infants fed the human milk + Human milk fortifier diet showed the lower relative abundance of Veillonella (P < 0.05) compared with that of the infants fed the human milk + formula diet. The gut microbiome of the infants fed the only formula diet showed the lowest microbial diversity and the highest relative abundance of Terrisporobacter (P < 0.05) compared with the gut microbiome of the infants fed the other diets. Correlation network analysis showed that urinary F2-isoprostane level was positively correlated with Terrisporobacter and Enterobacteriaceae abundance (P < 0.05) in the preterm infants. In conclusion, these data suggest that feeding practice affects the bacterial diversity and composition in the gut microbiome and is associated with oxidative stress in VLBW preterm infants.

KEYWORDS:

Feeding patterns; Microbiome; Newborn infants; Oxidative stress; Prematurity

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