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Acta Neurol Scand. 2019 Mar 9. doi: 10.1111/ane.13087. [Epub ahead of print]

Prestige of neurological disorders among future neurologists in Norway.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.
2
Department of General Practice, HELSAM, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
3
FORMI, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
4
Department of Neurology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
5
Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Research, Innovation and Education, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
6
Research Centre, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neurology has increasing subspecialization. Some disorders, such as cerebrovascular diseases, dementia and headache, are highly prevalent in the general population, while others, such as movement disorders and multiple sclerosis, are rarer. Thus, there may be a mismatch between neurologists' interests and the population needs.

AIMS OF THE STUDY:

To investigate the perceived prestige of neurological disorders among residents in neurology.

METHODS:

The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among residents in neurology in Norway.

RESULTS:

All the 17 neurological departments in Norway participated. In total, 143 residents participated (86% response rate). Mean age was 32.5 years. The respondents had on average 28 months of clinical training in neurology. The subspecialty with the highest prestige was cerebrovascular diseases, scored by 62% as the most prestigious, followed by multiple sclerosis (36%) and epilepsy (7%). The subspecialties with the lowest prestige were headache (2.8%) and dementia (1.4%). None of the tested variables (gender, age, months in clinical training or type of hospital) were associated with the perceived prestige of neurological disorders.

CONCLUSION:

Cerebrovascular disease was perceived as the most prestigious subspecialty. Headache and dementia, which are major contributors to worldwide disability, have low status among residents in neurology.

KEYWORDS:

education; neurology training; quality; subspecialty

PMID:
30851195
DOI:
10.1111/ane.13087

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